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  • Orangerie Orangerie
  • Orangerie view of glass roof and cast aluminum columns Orangerie view of glass roof and cast aluminum columns

It’s interesting to think that people who wanted to build would want to seek out some younger person who had had a different background. It’s a good reflection on the society that people wanted to have a new world.Oral History

Designed to be an invisible shelter, Goldberg described the resulting structure as "kind of an orangerie." The shimmering cube on the lakeshore consisted of two delicate aluminum columns which supported a cantilevered glass and aluminum framed roof. Stainless steel screens, specially woven to minimize the vertical mullions, completed the structure.

By the late 1930s Goldberg had developed a reputation as an innovative young architect, a fact that began earning him commissions. As stated by Goldberg, "I was young. I had a background which was quite different from older men. It's interesting to think that people who wanted to build would want to seek out some younger person who had a different background." The structure was commissioned by Howard Willet, head of the Willet Company, a large Illinois trucking firm.