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  • Entrance to Maxim's. (Orlando R. Cabanban photo, n.d.) Entrance to Maxim’s. (Orlando R. Cabanban photo, n.d.)
  • View of bar area. (Joanne Carney photo, n.d.) View of bar area. (Joanne Carney photo, n.d.)
  • View of lobby. (Joanne Carney photo, n.d.) View of lobby. (Joanne Carney photo, n.d.)
  • View of dining room. (Joanne Carney photo, n.d.) View of dining room. (Joanne Carney photo, n.d.)
  • Maxim's logo, designed by the office after a painting by Sem, an artist of the era. Maxim’s logo, designed by the office after a painting by Sem, an artist of the era.

Few would expect to find a touch of Paris tucked in the basement of a Gold Coast High Rise. At Astor Tower Goldberg created an exact replica of Maxim's de Paris, the famous Art Nouveau restaurant. Diners entered the restaurant via a dramatic staircase that swept from the jewel box street-level entrance lobby of Astor Tower to the restaurant lobby. From the wide-open and brightly-lit mirrored and marbled space of the restaurant lobby guests entered the dimly lit restaurant space. Within this windowless space stretching beneath the high-rise, Goldberg created a series of intimate spaces, including a library lavishly decorated in brass, mahogany, red velvet, and stained glass.

At the opening of Maxim's in 1963, Nancy and Bertrand Goldberg sat with Rudolph Nureyev and Margot Fontayn. Goldberg's wife Nancy had played a key role in the development of Astor Tower and Maxim's. The restaurant was an immediate success, and with the establishment of Maxim's the Goldberg's became quickly known as significant and lively members of Chicago's cultural life.