Heimbach House

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  • Heimbach Residence, view from street. (HB photo, 1939) Heimbach Residence, view from street. (HB photo, 1939)
  • Heimbach House, view from street showing chimney. (HB photo) Heimbach House, view from street showing chimney. (HB photo)
  • Heimbach House dining area and stairway. (HB photo, 1939) Heimbach House dining area and stairway. (HB photo, 1939)
  • Heimbach House living area. (HB photo, 1939) Heimbach House living area. (HB photo, 1939)
  • Heimbach House plan. Heimbach House plan.

Designed for a physician, his wife and son, the Heimbach House provided space for the varied activities of each. The first floor contained a living area, a dining area, a kitchen, and a four physician's office that included an X-ray room and dark room. The second floor, stepped back from the first, contained three bedrooms, a maid's room, three baths, a living room, and an outdoor terrace. A steel-framed structure, the home featured exterior walls of glass and common brick with wood details that accented the horizontal lines of the house. The most striking feature was the massive brick chimney at the corner of the house, which created a strong vertical contrast to the horizontal lines of the house. The chimney housed the heating and mechanical equipment for the house and provided storage space.

The Heimbach House received mixed reviews in Architectural Forum, which questioned the "unusually long" ten foot trek from the kitchen to the living room, the lack of closet space, and the "ponderous brick tower which housed the broiler and the playroom fireplace," which opined the reviewer "is certainly not in keeping with the architect's usual and commendable insistence upon the frank expression of function."