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  • Furniture for private residence, 1946. Furniture for private residence, 1946.
  • Glass-topped table with wooden legs for Synder Residence, 1952. Glass-topped table with wooden legs for Synder Residence, 1952.
  • Bent plywood couch designed for exhibition in the 1939 San Francisco World's Fair. Bent plywood couch designed for exhibition in the 1939 San Francisco World’s Fair.
  • Haitian Mahogany and stainless steel bed and end tables for Snyder Residence, 1952. Haitian Mahogany and stainless steel bed and end tables for Snyder Residence, 1952.
  • Plywood table with hand-laid lacquer constructed of single piece of plywood. Plywood table with hand-laid lacquer constructed of single piece of plywood.

"...If you go back to the Bauhaus period of Germany the role of the architect was supposed to be that of designing everything for the society, pots, pans, automobiles, clothes, dance, furniture and also buildings."
- Oral History

Goldberg began designing furniture in 1935. He worked independently, creating designs for individual clients. Goldberg designed two pieces of furniture for an exhibit at the 1939 World's Fair in San Francisco. Some of his designs were fabricated by the American Novelty Furniture Company (he later went on to design a factory expansion for the company), others were done in collaboration with his old friend, Michael van Beuren in Mexico.

Most of his innovative furniture was done in the late 1940's into the mid-1950's, and include innotive use of materials. This can be seen in his chromed steel chairs, benches of lucite or stone on bicycle spoke legs, tables of glass or wood on special metal legs, and other domestic pieces. One, a small jewelry case, featured a radial layout for its pivoting drawers, with functional benefits and presaging architectural designs yet to come. In general, the furniture pieces were exploratory, and for his own residence or for his other residential projects, such as the Florsheim Residence, Kirchheimer Residence, Helstein House, and Snyder House. None were ever put into series production.

In the early 1990's Goldberg revisited his glass dining table from the 1950's, and made four new ones of a revised design. One of these is at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.